Learning to use Facebook Live at a Social Media Surgery

Having been helped at a Social Media Surgery a year ago to set up her first social media account for a local support group, Linda has been a regular at Halesowen Social Media Surgery. Linda quickly got to grips with Twitter, however figuring out how best to use Facebook for the group took a little while. There are differences between Facebook Profiles, Pages and Group which need thinking through. Steph Clarke has written a really useful post about this which I’d recommend if you are thinking of using Facebook for a local group or organisation.

At last month’s surgery, Linda came along asking about what other social media she should be using, beyond Twitter and Facebook. We had a look at the great content Linda had been sharing through Twitter and Facebook, and I thought that the next challenge perhaps wasn’t something else, but rather looking at what Twitter and Facebook could do which Linda wasn’t making use of. I mentioned Facebook Live, and admitted that I hadn’t used it myself at that point, but I understood that it was a fun and immediate way of creating and sharing video within Facebook. (There are some useful tips from Facebook on getting the most out of Facebook Live.)

Linda and I quickly got playing and figured it out, at which point Libby from Halas Homes arrived to find out how to connect Twitter and Facebook accounts. She asked what we were doing, and was also excited to hear about Facebook Live. I suggested that Linda show Libby how to use it. And there it was… we created some Social Media Surgery magic. Linda had come along to receive some help, and now she was giving it. The video below captured the magic moment. Social Media Surgeries are brilliant because everyone can contribute and benefit at the same time.

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70% of the internet is video… time to develop your video making skills?

The wonderful Dan Slee and Darren Caveney of Comms2point0 have mentioned a few times in their blogs and rather wonderful weekly email that 70% of the internet is video. Each time I’ve read this I’ve wondered “is that because video files take up more space than text files?” (my understanding of the internet being rather rudimentary). Today I wanted to let you know about the NetSquared Midlands Meet-up on 16 May at which Dan will be describing the changing landscape of what is shared online and offering some tips on getting to grips with video making. So I decided to look up that 70% statistic as I wanted to understand it.

I learned from this article and similar ones that the statistic is probably from data provided by a North American broadband services company about home broadband internet usage during peak evening hours. The article is titled “Streaming Video Now Accounts for 70 Percent of Broadband Usage”, which is perhaps a bit misleading, but hey, it’s a headline and needed to be snappy. So the statistic is about what is streamed. Plus, the categorisation ‘video’ includes what I still think of as ‘TV’ – Netflix streaming takes a whopping 37% share of the broadband usage.

Which is not to say that we shouldn’t be getting to grips with video. Dan makes some great points in this succinct list of 7 things you need to know about video in 2016. The important ones for me in terms of ways that we can use social media to connect, communicate and collaborate are:

  • Video on the web is no longer just YouTube
    Once posting it to the 11-year-old social site and then sharing the link was enough. Not anymore. More than 500 million people watch Facebook video every day, according to Facebook.
  • Anyone can shoot video if their phone is good enough
    Go to your camera. Click the video option. Point your camera. Record. There you go. Done. If you have a smartphone you can do it.
  • The best video is of real people and not in an office
    Shoot footage of real people doing real things. They’ll be more interesting and they’ll also have friends, relatives, aunts and uncles who have Facebook profiles they’ll like and share that video on.

So why not take the opportunity to spend an evening with Dan Slee and the equally knowledgable NetSquared Midlands organisers Pauline Roche and Paul Webster, and get to grips with video? The NetSquared meet-up is on Monday 16 May, 6.30-8.30pm at Impact Hub Birmingham in Digbeth.

And what better to end this post with but a video? This is a beautiful video about Bread2Share, a successful Dudley social enterprise, made by the talented Simon of Reel Eyes Films, another social enterprise.